call for papers DAr #3

ISSN 2785-3152


The mosque. New forms and new characters

Edited by Claudia Sansò


The mosque is the most representative building in an Islamic city, a synthesis of religious and collective space in Muslim life. The first mosques in the oldest Islamic cities were built with a few simple elements. As K.A.C. Creswell writes in Early Muslim Architecture, «At Basra, founded about AD 635, the first mosque, according to Baladhuri, was simply marked out (ikhtatta) and the people prayed there without any building. According to another version, also given by Baladhuri, it was enclosed by a fence of reeds. At Kufa, founded in AD 638, the first mosque was equally primitive. Its boundaries were fixed by a man who threw an arrow towards the quibla, then another towards the north, another to the west, and a fourth to the east. A square whit each side two arrow-casts in length was thus formed. This area was not enclosed by walls but by a ditch only, and the sole architectural feature was a covered colonnade (zulla) 200 cubits long, which ran the whole length of the south side».

Despite the Prophet's words: «A building is the vainest of undertakings, that can devour the wealth of a believer», beautiful and sumptuous mosques have been built throughout the centuries since the Hegira, both modestly sized, the local or neighborhood mosques (masjid) and larger, the so-called “congregational mosques” or “Friday mosques” (masjid jami).

According to Julius Wellhausen, the mosque constituted the foro of early Islam, the place of assembly, where measures concerning Islamic society were taken.


The next issue of DAr intends to investigate, starting from this theory, the theme of the mosque as a collective space as well as a religious building. This analysis is proposed both in order to investigate its typological evolution - from the model of Mohammed's house in Medina to the Ottoman mosques of Sinan - to establish a fertile comparison with more recent constructions, and as an "urban fact" by investigating its role within the urban fabric, especially in the cases of European cities whose morphology is based on different rules of arrangement from those of cities in which the mosque model has been consolidated.


The call for papers will therefore welcome those contributions that investigate the architectural and urban characters of the mosque, with particular attention to the project of new buildings through two tracks:


  • “the architecture of the mosque. Typological, formal and spatial renovations”

The latest design experiments seem to signal a change on a formal level, a typological renovation due to the modification that the Islamic rite is undergoing as it is updated to the times and places.

Does the mosque therefore still retain its traditional role as a place of worship and public space, central to the men (and, to a lesser extent, women) of a neighborhood or group?

This section will welcome contributions analysing the forms, typological and spatial characters, and linguistic expressions of the mosque building, especially in its most recent declinations.

  • “the mosque and the city. Comparison between the European city model and the Islamic model

The design of a contemporary mosque should probably aim at rethinking a building linked to Muslim worship that must not only be able to manifest in form and character the practise of the Islamic rite, but also " mean" its forms through the relationship they establish with those of the city in an idea of spatial definition that, in the case of new buildings in European cities, encourages integration and the encounter between the Islamic and western worlds.

So what can be the ideas behind an open comparison between the model of the European city and the Islamic model?

This section will welcome contributions that will investigate the role of the mosque in relation to the city, both in Islamic territory - analysing the connection between the architecture of the mosque and the surrounding urban forms - and in the European context, considering the mosque building as a possible device for public and civic sharing.




Abstract

Participation is open to professors, researchers, PhD holders and candidates, scholars.

Authors are asked to submit one .pdf file (in English or Italian) to redazione@darjournal.com.

The document must contain:

  • title (max 100 digits with spaces);

  • possible subtitle (100 digits with spaces);

  • 3 keywords;

  • abstract (max 2500 digits with spaces);

  • 1 iconic image.


Abstracts are due by 07th August 2022 at 12:00 A.M. Rome time.



Full papers

Authors of selected abstracts, must submit their full papers to redazione@darjournal.com by 23th October 2022. Full papers undergo a procedure of double-blind peer review.

Being an international journal, papers in Italian should be translated into English.


Important dates


07th July: Launch of the call for papers

07th August: abstract submission deadline

04th September: Notification of acceptance/rejection

23th October: full paper submission deadline

13th November: notification of the double-blind peer review results

18th Dcemeber: final submission of papers (with translation) and images






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call for papers DAr #2

ISSN 2785-3152


Cities of the Islamic world

Edited by Cecilia Fumagalli, Eliana Martinelli



DAr’s first issue has highlighted the complexity of the architectural practice in the Islamic world, its characters and geographies, its multiple identities. The second issue, strictly connected to the first, aims at deepening the themes around the architecture of the cities of the Islamic world.

«The cities and the other forms of urbanization […] united because they belong to the world of Islam, are far from being a solid and unanimous matter, defined by precise chronological limits and territorial settings, or by homogeneous ethnic contexts. On the contrary, they belong to a timeframe – corresponding to the last fourteen centuries of our history – unusually long for this kind of issue. Moreover, they are widespread across a vast area, extended to more or less important portions of the three continents of the Ancient World, and they express recognizable contributions of a great number of civilizations, ideologies, people». With these words, Paolo Cuneo opens the first chapter of his Storia dell’urbanistica il mondo islamico published in 1986 by Laterza, by highlighting that the cities of the Islamic world should not be considered univocally, even though they have common characters. Instead, these cities are the tangible expression of different cultures and identities, the result of histories, overlaps, transformations and modifications that have made them unique.

William Marçais, in his L’Islamisme et la vie urbaine (1928), states that Islam could be considered an eminently urban religion, as the city, being the social catalyst of nomad populations, assumed the role of externalizing the faith, while morphologically expressing the doctrine of Unity (Tawhid). The sunna, in fact, by determining all human activities, directly influences the environment and the form of the city, according to a language linked to the different Islamic cultures.

The call for papers welcomes those contributions able to explore both the common characters of the cities of the Islamic world and their specificities. Contributions can refer to the following sections:

  • “the formation of the city”: the section may include contributions proposing typo-morphological studies on urban fabrics of the Islamic world, also exemplified through specific case studies, on the architectures and landscape elements that have defined the development and the form of the cities. The analyses should hopefully highlight the transformation processes that have characterized the urban fabric, in order to deduce possible design principles.

  • “city and project”: the section includes contributions dedicated to urban design in the Islamic world, intended as the relation between the architectural object and the city. Contributions should highlight the urban value of the proposed projects, their continuity or discontinuity with the historic city and the pre-existing stratigraphic conformations, by adequately motivating reasons and design choices.









Abstract

Participation is open to professors, researchers, PhD holders and candidates, scholars.

Authors are asked to submit one .pdf file (in English or Italian) to redazione@darjournal.com.

The document must contain:

  • title (max 100 digits with spaces);

  • possible subtitle (100 digits with spaces);

  • 3 keywords;

  • abstract (max 2500 digits with spaces);

  • 1 iconic image.


Abstracts are due by 18th March 2022.

Full papers

Authors of selected abstracts, must submit their full papers to redazione@darjournal.com by 24th April 2022. Full papers undergo a procedure of double-blind peer review.

Being an international journal, papers in Italian should be translated into English.

Important dates

18th February: Launch of the call for papers

18th March: abstract submission deadline

25th March: Notification of acceptance/rejection

24th April: full paper submission deadline

15th May: notification of the double-blind peer review results

12th June: final submission of papers (with English translation) and images




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